September 19, 2021

SD Times news digest: Rust 1.50.0 released, Go generics accepted, and RapidAPI acquires Paw

SD Times news digest: Rust 1.50.0 released, Go generics accepted, and RapidAPI acquires Paw

SD Times news digest: Rust 1.50.0 released, Go generics accepted, and RapidAPI acquires Paw

This latest Rust release includes improved array indexing, expanded safe access to union fields, and additions to the standard library. 

In the new version, the stabilization of arrays in Rust is formally acknowledged. There are nine new stable functions in Rust 1.50.0 and a few existing functions were made ‘const.’ 

Additional details on all of the changes in Rust, Cargo, and Clippy are available here.

Go generics accepted
The support for type parameters to Go will change the Go language to support a form of generic programming.

Generics will provide building blocks that let users share code and build programs more easily, according to the team behind Go. Users can write a function that operates on a slice of an arbitrary data type where the actual data type is only specified when the function is called, Ian Lance Taylor, a principal engineer at Google wrote in a blog post.

Other proposed changes are for functions to have an additional type parameter list that uses square brackets but otherwise looks like an ordinary parameter list, for type constraints to work as interface types, and more changes listed on Go’s GitHub page.

RapidAPI acquires Paw
The acquisition will offer a more tightly integrated workflow for designing and developing APIs with Paw and then testing and monitoring them with RapidAPI Testing and then sharing and managing them on the RapidAPI Marketplace or RapidAPI Enterprise Hub. 

“We view APIs and microservices as the fundamental building blocks for modern software. Our goal is to provide the best possible platform for developers – from building APIs to consuming them,” Iddo Gino, the CEO and founder of RapidAPI wrote in a blog post. “Paw is an indispensable part of the API development process, your “copilot” – helping you design and develop your API.”

At first, the goal is to make the tool more widely available by implementing support for Web, Windows, and Linux versions since the tool has only been Mac-native up to now.